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never visited ILEOTIBIAL BAND SYNDROME
Contributed by: Investigaciones Medicas, Radiologist, Investigaciones Medicas, Argentina.
History: Tenderness just up from the head of the fibula (the bone bump on the outer side of the knee, just around from the kneecap tendon. Pain occurs when the knee is fully straightened or fully bent, spread up the thigh or down the shin bone. This pain may be made worse by running on hills, running downhill, or climbing stairs.
Images:[small]larger

Fig. 1: T1WI. Coronal plane. Thick ileotibial band

Fig. 2: T1WI. Transverse plane. Thick ileotibial band

Fig. 3: T1WI. Transverse plane. Thick ileotibial band

Fig. 4: T2WI. Coronal plane. Thick and hyperintense ileotibial band. Bone bruise in the adjacent tibial plateau
Findings: MR images show partial disruption of the ileotibial tract, soft tissue edema, and maybe a bone bruise in the femoral condyle.
Diagnosis: ILEOTIBIAL BAND SYNDROME
Discussion: : The ileotibial band is a long, wide tendon shaped structure, located on the outside of the leg. It starts near the hip joint, and runs along the outside of the leg. It then attaches to the tibia (shin bone) near the knee. Occasionally, this band of tissue becomes irritated and inflamed and causes pain: a condition known as ileotibial band syndrome. Is most common in sports that require repetitive bending of the knee. In particular, long distance runners and cyclists are particularly susceptible. Treatment: attack the cause, but back off the mileage and take anti-inflammatory drugs.
References: Resnik D, Kang H. Internal derangenments of joints. Saunders, 1997, USA
Comments:
Simoncini A, Rombola A. Investigaciones Medicas Imaging Center--Investigaciones Medicas, 2004-02-13
Additional Details:

Case Number: 338923Last Updated: 02-13-2004
Anatomy: Skeletal System   Pathology: Trauma
Modality: MR, USExam Date: Access Level: Readable by all users
Keywords: ileotibial band, msk

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